Cardio Metabolic Research at Leeds

Endothelial Cell Biology and Diabetes

 

 

Endothelial Cell Biology and Diabetes

This group investigates molecular mechanisms and endothelial cell function such as vascular physiology, insulin-sensitivity, diet, exercise and diabetes. Recent discoveries made by the group include: the Piezo1 ion channel regulation of vascular physiology; IGF-1 regulation of endothelial repair and progenitor cell development; VEGF-A isoform-mediated regulation of endothelial signal transduction, gene expression and inflammation; exercise interval training to improve arterial stiffness and heart rate dynamics; FGF-regulated signal transduction in human disease; the role of the TRPM2 ion channel in controlling vascular physiology and diabetes; the effect of flavonoids, polyphenols and diet on metabolism and diabetes.

 

Investigators

 

 

David Beech
David Beech FMedSci

My research addresses fundamental understanding of calcium ion entry and non-selective cationic channels in vascular physiology and disease. In partnership with medicinal chemists I work to translate this understanding through the discovery of novel small-molecule modulators.

Staff webpage

Marc Bailey
Marc Bailey

I am currently investigating novel agents which block the Orai1 calcium channel against AAA vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction, AAA development and AAA progression.

Staff webpage

Karen Birch
Karen Birch

My research group comprises a team of researchers with an intense focus on investigation of the interplay between female reproductive hormone fluctuation, exercise and cardiovascular health and function.

Staff webpage

Robin Bon
Robin Bon

We use chemical approaches to study the structure, localisation, interactions and functions of proteins implicated in cardiovascular disease. Examples are: 1) the development of chemical probes to identify new small molecule binding sites in ion channels; 2) the development of chemically-labelled non-antibody binding proteins (Adhirons) for in vivo imaging of inflammatory markers.

Staff webpage

Richard Cubbon
Richard Cubbon

Our research is focussed on understanding how insulin resistance and diabetes impact upon the function and regeneration of blood vessels, with the aim of establishing novel drug and cell-based therapies which retard or regress cardiovascular complications.

Staff webpage

Stuart Egginton
Stuart Egginton

My group studies the mechanisms of blood vessel growth, using physiological remodelling to devise targetted therapeutic repair of a pathologically damaged microcirculation (e.g. alleviating ischaemia by improving muscle vascular supply), interactions between the cardiovascular and respiratory systems in exercise and hypothermia, and the role of skeletal muscle adaptability in ensuring exercise capacity.

Staff webpage

Karen Forbes
Karen Forbes

My research is focused on dissecting the molecular and cellular events that control placental development and fetal growth. I have a program of research that is aimed at understanding how the maternal environment (eg. growth factors and nutrition) and microRNAs (miRNAs) influence these processes.

Staff webpage

Marlous Hall

I am a Senior Epidemiologist with expertise in advanced analytical techniques applied to linked healthcare data. I currently have a particular focus and interest in Cardiovascular Epidemiology.

Staff webpage

Mark Kearney
Mark Kearney

Our laboratory, funded by a British Heart Foundation programme grant, is exploring the mechanistic link between endothelial function and insulin resistance.

Staff webpage

John Ladbury

The aim of the lab is to investigate mechanisms of intracellular signal transduction to find out how aberrancy in kinase-mediated pathways lead to disease.

Staff webpage

Lynn Mckeown
Lynn Mckeown

I am a cell biologist and I study how endothelial cells (specialised cells that line the blood vessels) maintain vascular health, focussing on molecular pathways that control blood clotting and inflammation.

Carmen Molina-Paris
Carmen Molina-Paris

My main current interest is modelling immune responses.
Three main themes are of special interest:

  1. T cell receptor-ligand binding and T cell receptor signalling, What determines the ability of T cells to discriminate different antigens.
  2. Size and receptor diversity of the different T cell populations.
  3. Interactions, in vivo and in real time, between dendritic cells (that display antigens on their membrane) and T cells (that display on their membrane T cell receptors).

Staff webpage

Georgia Mavria

Staff webpage

Bernadette Moore
Bernadette Moore

The research in my group is focused on the role of hepatic nutrient metabolism in healthy ageing and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is now the most common cause of liver disease affecting an estimated 30% of adults and 10% of children worldwide. There are currently no effective pharmaceutical therapies for NAFLD but nutrition is a key modifiable risk factor.

Staff webpage

Sreenivasan Ponnambalam

The aim of our lab is to investigate how soluble factors such as growth factors and lipid particles regulate cellular responses within blood vessels and how such events are altered in cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer.

Staff webpage

Karen Porter
Karen Porter

My group investigates the cellular and molecular pathways that lead to increased coronary heart disease and poor outcomes after arterial bypass grafting in individuals with type 2 diabetes.

Staff webpage

Lee Roberts

My research focusses on the inter-organ signalling roles of metabolites in energy homeostasis. I have a particular interest in adipose tissue and the initiation of the thermogenic response and regulation of fatty acid oxidation in beige, brown and white fat tissue, with a view to uncovering novel treatments for type 2 diabetes and obesity.

Staff webpage

Asipu Sivaprasadarao
Asipu Sivaprasadarao

My laboratory is interested in understanding the cellular and molecular basis for how oxidative stress affects the biology of vascular and pancreatic cells, with an emphasis on the role of ion channels. More recent interest includes the role of ion channels in cell migration.

Staff webpage

Piruthivi Sukumar
Piruthivi Sukumar

My research focuses primarily on understanding altered reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ionic calcium signaling in vascular cells in relation to different cardiometabolic diseases. In specific I am interested in NOX group of enzymes as source of ROS molecules and their expression and functional patterns in endothelial cells. Our ultimate goal is understanding the pathophysiology of diabetes induced vascular diseases to develop new drug targets and management strategies.

Staff webpage

Stephen Wheatcroft
Stephen Wheatcroft

My research focuses on the use of genetically altered murine models to investigate the effects of insulin and the IGF-binding proteins on vascular biology.

Staff webpage

Gary Williamson
Gary Williamson

The aim of my group is to discover how biologically active polyphenols and related molecules affect the biochemical processes and risk factors which lead to metabolic diseases.

Staff webpage

What's Happening

18 January 2018: Bridging the gap between molecules and millimetres: In vivo assessment of myocardial microstructure and function using diffusion tensor CMR ... more

08 February 2018:  ... more

15 February 2018: MCRC Seminar ... more

Athena Swan